Que Sera Sera

pascalcampion:

Just gorgeous!

(Source: priscillaworks)

fotojournalismus:

Day 9: Four boys killed while playing football on beachIsrael warns 100,000 Gazans to evacuate their homeshospitals and medical facilities being targeted by airstrikesWafa hospital was hit by an Israeli helicopter attack but defies Israel evacuation warning amid fears for frail patientsGaza deaths pass 200 | July 16, 2014

1. A woman cries as Palestinians flee their homes in the Shajaiyeh neighbourhood of Gaza City, after Israel had airdropped leaflets warning people to leave the area. (Lefteris Pitarakis/AP)

2. Smoke rises after Israeli missile strikes hit the northern Gaza Strip. (Adel Hana/AP)

3. The father and brother of a Palestinian boy from the Baker family, whom medics said was killed with other three children from the same family by a shell fired by an Israeli naval gunboat, mourn during their funeral. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)

4. A Palestinian man looks at a house destroyed by Israeli Defense Forces during an overnight air strike in Gaza City. (Oliver Weiken/EPA)

5. A staff member of the Al Wafa hospital in the Shuja’iyya neighbourhood in Gaza City looks at the remains of an Israeli Defense Force warning missile. (Oliver Weiken/EPA)

6. A Palestinian woman, who fled her home close to the border with Israel, stays at a United Nations-run school in Gaza City. (Finbarr O’Reilly/Reuters)

7. Palestinians run for shelter as they hear bombing in the distance while they flee their homes in the Shajaiyeh neighbourhood of Gaza City, after Israel had airdropped leaflets warning people to leave the area. (Lefteris Pitarakis/AP)

8. A Palestinian man cries as he holds the dead body of his young brother shortly after he was killed in the morgue of the al-Shifa hospital. (Oliver Weiken/EPA)

9. Palestinians salvage what they can of their belongings from the rubble of their destroyed house following an early morning Israeli missile strike in Gaza City. (Khalil Hamra/AP)

10. Palestinians sleep at the yard of a UN school in the northern Gaza Strip town of Beit Lahiya, after evacuating their houses near the border with Israel. (Mohammed Abed/Getty Images)

(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 | Naming the dead)

cross-connect:

Featured Curator of the Week: Philip Intile [pi-slices]

Charlie Deck is an artist on Tumblr who posts an animated GIF every day under the name bigblueboo. Most of his sketches are studies in other artists styles or tests of different techniques. So far, the GIFs he has created are exercises in service of developing an aesthetic, not the result of a fully realized one. Through practice, a handful of clear themes have emerged: negative space, perception, simulations and cycles. He uses Processing, Cinema 4D, Unity, openFrameworks and shader programming to create his art. 

projecthabu:

     Here, we have the Saturn V rocket, housed inside the Apollo/Saturn V Center at Kennedy Space Center near Titusville, Florida, just a few miles from Launch complex 39, where these beasts once roared into the sky.

     When we look at the enormous first stage of the Saturn V rocket, called an S-IC, we think “spaceship”. Truthfully, the Saturn V first stage never actually made it into space. The stage only burned for the first 150 seconds of flight, then dropped away from the rest of the rocket, all while remaining totally inside Earth’s atmosphere. The S-IC stage is merely an aircraft.

     Even more truthfully, the S-IC stage displayed here at the Apollo/Saturn V Center at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, never flew at all. It is a static test article, fired while firmly attached to the ground, to make sure the rocket would actually hold together in flight. Obviously, these tests were successful, (e.g. she didn’t blow up), and she sits on our Apollo museum today. I wrote more about this particular stage in a previous post, (click here to view.)

     The rest of the rocket, the second and third stages, called the S-II and S-IVB stages, did fly into space. The S-II put the manned payload into orbit, and the S-IVB was responsible for initially propelling that payload from earth orbit to the moon, an act called “trans-lunar injection” (TLI).

     The particular rocket in this display, except for the first stage, is called SA-514. 514 was going to launch the cancelled Apollo 18 and 19 moon missions.

     The command/service module (CSM) in the photos is called CSM-119. This particular capsule is unique to the Apollo program, because it has five seats. All the others had three. 119 could launch with a crew of three, and land with five, because it was designed it for a possible Skylab rescue mission. It was later used it as a backup capsule for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.

(via thisistheverge)

(Source: maxwell-d, via namaste-mommy)

landscapelifescape:

Arizona, USA

(by ~ Floydian ~ )

(via geologyrocks)